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Friday, April 24, 2020 | History

2 edition of influence of gastrointestinal mucus on drug absorption. found in the catalog.

influence of gastrointestinal mucus on drug absorption.

David R. L. Hughes

influence of gastrointestinal mucus on drug absorption.

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  • 16 Currently reading

Published by Brighton Polytechnic, Dept. of Pharmacy] in [Brighton .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (Ph.D.) - Brighton Polytechnic, 1988.

ContributionsBrighton Polytechnic. Department of Pharmacy.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13918515M

Teprenone is a gastric mucosal protective drug without affecting gastric acid secretion and clinically used in Japan for treatment of gastritis. This drug has been reported to reveal various pharmacological actions including the promotion of gastrointestinal mucus (Iwai et al., ; Rokutan et al., ).Cited by: 5. Drugs that exert an effect on the gastrointestinal tract are among the most frequently used drugs. Digestive diseases are estimated to affect 60 to 70 million people in the United States each year with an annual direct cost of more than $85 billion. 23 There is a high likelihood that a patient coming into the dental office may be on a regimen of one or more of these agents.   The absorption of drugs via the oral route is a subject of intense and continuous investigation in the pharmaceutical industry since good bioavailability implies that the drug is able to reach the systemic circulation by mouth. Oral dry absorption is Cited by:


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influence of gastrointestinal mucus on drug absorption. by David R. L. Hughes Download PDF EPUB FB2

Physiological factors influencing oral drug absorption. The gastrointestinal tract is complex. Figure outlines some of the main structures involved in and key physiological parameters that affect oral drug absorption. In order to gain an insight into the numerous factors that can potentially influence the rate and extent of drug absorption into the systemic circulation, a schematic.

Oral drug absorption is the movement of the drug from its site of administration, gastrointestinal (GI), into the bloodstream. The oral absorption of the drug in solid dosage form from the GI is largely controlled by (1) dissolution rate and solubility, which determine how fast a drug reaches maximum concentration in the GI fluid; and (2.

THE EFFECT OF GASTRO-INTESTINAL MUCUS ON DRUG ABSORPTION TABLE II A DESCRIPTION OF THE VARIOUS MUCUS GLYCOPROTEIN COMPONENTS [41] Component Description Basic unit Basic mucin block, Mr 5glycosylated central core region plus 1 or 2 regions of naked peptide T-domain Product remaining after treatment of mucin with Cited by:   The literature concerning the influence of food, and also fluid volumes, on drug absorption is reviewed.

In most cases, the absorption of drugs from the gastrointestinal tract is reduced or delayed by food. However, some drugs are unaffected by food, while the absorption of a small number of drugs is increased. Observed effects of food on drug absorption are the net Cited by: The influence of intestinal mucus components on the diffusion of drugs.

Larhed AW(1), Artursson P, Björk E. Author information: (1)Dept. of Pharmacy/Division of Pharmaceutics, Uppsala University, Sweden. PURPOSE: Mucus, a potential diffusional barrier to drug absorption, is a complex mixture of mucin and other by: b) Lipophilicity and drug absorption: o Ideally for optimum absorption, a drug should have sufficient aq solubility to dissolve in fluids at absorption site and lipid solubility (Ko/w) high enough to facilitate the partitioning of the rug in the lipoidal biomembrane i.e.

drug should have perfect HLB for optimum Size: KB. Absorption from the intestine is dependent on: (1) the physiochemical state of the substance, (2) the nonabsorptive physiologic functions and state of the intestine, (3) the metabolic activity and functions of the absorbing cell, and (4) the structure of the absorbing surface.

Certain changes within each of the four categories will produce uniform or predictable changes in drug Cited by:   Mucus is a viscoelastic and adhesive gel that protects the lung airways, gastrointestinal (GI) tract, vagina, eye and other mucosal surfaces. Most foreign particulates, including conventional particle-based drug delivery systems, are efficiently trapped in human mucus layers by steric obstruction and/or by:   2.

DRUG: • A drug is injected • Thus, absorption is an important intravascularly (iv or ia) prerequisite step directly enters into systemic circulation.

• Majority of drugs are administered extravascularly (generally orally). • Such drugs can exert the pharmacological action only when they come into systemic circulation from their site. Drug absorption is determined by the drug’s physicochemical properties, formulation, and route of administration.

Dosage forms (eg, tablets, capsules, solutions), consisting of the drug plus other ingredients, are formulated to be given by various routes (eg, oral, buccal, sublingual, rectal, parenteral, topical, inhalational).

Oral delivery is the most common method for drug administration. However, poor solubility, stability, and bioavailability of many drugs make achieving therapeutic levels via the gastrointestinal. The possible influence of advanced age on intestinal drug absorption was investigated by determining the effects of aging on (i) solubility of model.

Learning Outcomes Review the ways in which drugs may move though barriers to their absorption Know how pH differences may alter drug absorption Identify that physical/chemical properties, route of administration and drug formulation are the factors which interact to influence drug absorption Understand the details of the process of absorption along the length of the.

Advantages of intra vaginal drug delivery system Prolonged release, Minimal systemic side effects, An increase in bioavailability, Use of less total drug than an oral dose, First-pass metabolism can be avoided, Self medication is possible.

Contact with digestive fluid is avoided and degradation of drug is minimized by: 7. Drug absorption from the gastrointestinal tract 1. Drug Absorption from the Gastrointestinal Tract Presented by- Manohar D Kengar, pharmaceutics FY Rajarambapu College of Pharmacy Kasegaon 1/30/ 1 2.

Functions of gastrointestinal system • Motility of GIT: Drugs are better absorbed in normal GIT movement. Mucus: Secreted by the other glands (Mandibular and sublingual). FNXN: Lubrication of food and it serves as a buffer. Lactoferrin: Binds Fe in mouth, preventing bacteria from getting it.

It thereby serves as an antibacterial role. Lingual Lipase: Released from tongue itself, allows easy movement of fats on the tongue. 2) the segment of the gastrointestinal tract from which the drug is well absorbed and beyond which the drug is either poorly absorbed or not absorbed at all.

After oral administration, most drugs are well absorbed in the duodenum and to a lesser extent in the jejunum. A small amount of drug absorption may occur from the ileum. processes of absorption, distribution, and excretion. • Explain how bioavailability can impact drug response and product selection.

• Compare the roles of passive diffusion and carrier-medi-ated transport in drug absorption. • Describe two types of drug interaction and explain how they might affect drug response and Size: KB.

to absorption) and the outer part (serosal surface) lie the muscular structures, some of From a historical point of view, this class of drug is the most important for gastrointestinal diseases.

In fact, the introduction of antisecretory compounds, firstly Overview on Gastrointestinal Pharmacology - Stefano EvangelistaFile Size: KB. About Gastrointestinal Disorders: Gastrointestinal Surgery includes surgery for diseases of the gastrointestinal tract (esophagus, stomach, small intestine and colon), pancreas and liver.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances. Active transport processes, as found in the upper regions of the gastrointestinal tract, have not been shown to be present in the rectal area.

For a generalized discussion on drug absorption, the reader is referred to Part 4 of this book. However, some specific points concerning rectal absorption will be discussed here. diffusion of HCl and prevents degradation of mucus by pepsin and acid. Sucralfate is effective for the treatment of duodenal ulcers and prevention of stress ulcers, its use is limited due to the need for multiple daily dosing and drug–drug interactions.

Bismuth subsalicylate: Antimicrobial actions, inhibits the activity of pepsin,File Size: KB. Therefore, gastric emptying is an important factor influencing the rate of drug absorption.

Foods, especially fat, can slow gastric emptying. Absorption can be limited by the short transit period of the drug through the small intestine ( hours).

Colon is usually a poor site of absorption due to its low permeability and relatively low surface. The weak base is absorbed at a faster rate from the intestine (pH – 8), this is because the basic substances can’t be ionized in basic medium. So the uncharged substances can be passed easily due to its lipid solubility.

Similarly, weak acid is absorbed at a faster rate from stomach (pH – 2). But, many uncharged drugs can’t be. Absorption is used to described the journey of a drug travelling from the site of administration to site of action.

Successfully describing absorption involves several steps. First, the drug needs to be introduced via some route of administration (oral, topical-dermal, etc.) and its dosage form (eg, tablets, capsules, solutions) is supposed to be given.

Abstract: Gastrointestinal (GI) motility is a physiological factor that affects oral drug absorption by controlling a drug's residence time in the GI tract. The development of an oral drug absorption model, the pulsatile emptying transit (PET) model, which takes into account variations in GI motility due to the migrating motor complex (MMC) is described.

Constipation, particularly in drugs with a long half life (a reference to how long it takes for concentration of a drug to go down to half of it's original potency in your body), could certainly also affect absorption; perhaps increasing absorption levels. I am neither a doctor nor a scientist, but this just seems logical.

When a drug is ionizable, as aspirin and 3-amino-phenol are, then the solubility in water is influenced by pH. This point is highly relevant to an understanding of drug absorption from the gastrointestinal tract because the pH of its aqueous contents varies from to 3 in the stomach to about 8 in the intestine (2).

At the gastric pH of –3. Mucosal drug delivery accounts for various administration routes (i.e., oral, vaginal, ocular, pulmonary, etc.) and offers a vast surface for the permeation of drugs. However, the mucus layer which shields and lubricates all mucosal tissues can compromise drugs from reaching the epithelial site, thus affecting their absorption and therapeutic effect.

Therefore, the effect of the Author: Margherita Falavigna, Paul C. Stein, Gøril Eide Flaten, Massimiliano Pio di Cagno.

In recent years, the emphasis in drug development has been the design of new delivery systems rather than new drugs. It is the aim of innovative pharmaceutical scientists to design the new dosage forms to overcome the body's barrier mechanisms which have specifically evolved to exclude foreign book provides an integrated approach to the study of 4/5(1).

What action does the histamine-2 antagonist administered by the nurse have on the human body that will help to prevent peptic ulcer disease. A) Destroys Helicobacter pylori B) Coats and protects the stomach lining C) Increases the pH of the secreted hydrochloric acid D) Reduces the amount of hydrochloric acid secreted Ans: D Feedback: Histamine-2 antagonists are.

Purchase Nutrition, Digestion, Metabolism - 1st Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBNBook Edition: 1. The oral route and oral absorption. Drug absorption from the gastrointestinal tract. The oral route is the most widely used and convenient route of drug administration for those drugs that can survive the acid of the stomach, that are resistant to enzymatic attack and that are absorbed across GI membranes.

Mucus is the first biological component inhaled drugs encounter on their journey towards their pharmacological target in the upper airways. Yet, how mucus may influence drug disposition and efficacy in the lungs has been essentially overlooked.

In this study, a simple in vitro system was developed to investigate the factors promoting drug interactions with airway mucus in Author: Safar Alqahtani, Clive J.

Roberts, Snjezana Stolnik, Cynthia Bosquillon. Disintegration of Solid Foods in Human Stomach F. K ONG AND ABSTRACT: Knowledge of the disintegration of solid foods in human stomach is essential to assess the bioavail-ability of nutrients in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract.

A comprehensive review of food gastric digestion, focusing on disintegration of solid foods, is presented. There is considerable evidence in the literature that the rate of drug absorption from gastrointestinal tract is one of major factors for the determination of drug action ().

In a previous paper, it was reported that the serum concentration of aminopyrine or sulpyrine after oral administration in rabbits showed marked difference according to Cited by: 8. Environmental toxins are ubiquitous in our modern world, and high levels of exposure are associated with several chronic diseases.

While we typically think of the liver as the primary site of detoxification, the gut and its associated microbes play an incredibly important role in determining the toxicity of compounds.

The rate of drug absorption following oromucosal administration is influenced by the permeability of the buccal and sublingual mucosa, physical-chemical properties of the delivered drug, and other factors, namely the presence and properties of mucus, saliva production, movement of the oral tissues during speaking, food and drink intake, : Josef Mašek, Eliška Mašková, Daniela Lubasová, Roman Špánek, Milan Raška, Jaroslav Turanek.

Nanoparticles (NPs) have demonstrated great potential for the oral delivery of protein drugs that have very limited oral bioavailability.

Orally administered NPs could be absorbed by the epithelial tissue only if they successfully permeate through the mucus that covers the epithelium. However, efficient epithelial absorption and mucus permeation require very different surface properties.

The esophagus (also spelled oesophagus/esophagus) or gullet is the muscular tube in vertebrates through which ingested food passes from the throat to the stomach.

The esophagus is continuous with the laryngeal part of the pharynx at the level of the C6 vertebra. It connects the pharynx, which is the body cavity that is common to both the digestive and respiratory systems behind. Keywords:Stress, mucus, mucin, bacterial component, gut microbiota, mucin-degradation.

Abstract:Stress shows both direct- and indirect-effects on the functions of the gastrointestinal tract, in particular on the mucus physiology and the composition of microbiota. Mucus mainly consists of heavily glycosylated proteins called mucins, which are Cited by: 2.

The authors discuss the common causes and pathophysiology of gastroparesis, as well as its diagnosis and treatment including prokinetic drugs, novel medical agents, and gastric electrical stimulation.A Review on Oral Mucosal Drug Delivery System Rakesh Hooda*, Mohit Tripathi and Prof.

Kiran Kapoor Submitted Accepted for publication Buccal controlled drug delivery system has been developed since the environment of the oral cavity provides potential sites for drug delivery.

The acid hydrolysis and first pass effects can be.